OctoberReport - page 4

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October 2013 CBA REPORT
president’s brief
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hhh Fall! When the days get shorter, the
evenings crisper, and the leaves begin
to change. And when the “airwaves,”
our physical and virtual mailboxes, the nightly
news and front yards become littered with all
manner of campaign detritus. Yes, election
season is upon us!
By the time this article is published, we will
be in the thick of things. Already, however, the
Cincinnati Enquirer’s
self-proclaimed “Truth
Squad” is hard at work “fact-check[ing]” vari-
ous mayoral ads and doing “in-depth watchdog
reporting and investigation,” and the ever-
beleaguered Anthony Weiner is shouting down
a Jewish constituent on the eve of Rosh Hasha-
nah. I, personally, will be watching the doings
in Cincinnati and Hamilton County with great
interest from the sidelines — not voting in Ohio
elections is the one part of getting married and
moving to Kentucky that I’ve just not been able
to assimilate.
This year there are seven judicial races in
Hamilton County — all for Municipal Court
seats and all of which are unopposed. I am
sorry to have to report that the public will no
longer have the benefit of the CBA’s judicial
polling results to potentially inform their judi-
cial choices. Because the results of the election
poll are largely ignored by the local media, and
therefore not noticed by the public, the Board
has voted to discontinue the polling. That’s not
to say, however, that I’m above using my pulpit
to encourage civilized debate. On that score, I’d
like to offer a little “food for political thought,”
compliments of the
Orlando Sentinel
.
Charley Reese, a retired
Sentinel
colum-
nist who for decades argued forcefully for less
government and more personal freedom, died
on May 21, 2013. Almost 30 years ago, Reese
penned the following words, which resonate
perhaps even more today.
By Jean Geoppinger McCoy
Are They? Are There? Do You?
545 people are responsible for the mess,
but they unite in a common con
by Charley Reese
Politicians are the only people in the world who create problems and then
campaign against them.
Have you ever wondered why, if both the Democrats and the Republicans
are against deficits, we have deficits? Have you ever wondered why, if all the pol-
iticians are against inflation and high taxes, we have inflation and high taxes?
You and I don’t propose a federal budget. The president does. You and I
don’t have the constitutional authority to vote on appropriations. The House of
Representatives does. You and I don’t write the tax code. The Congress does.
You and I don’t set fiscal policy. The Congress does. You and I don’t control
monetary policy. The Federal Reserve Bank does.
One hundred senators, 435 congressmen, one president, and nine Supreme
Court justices — 545 human beings out of 238 million — are directly, legally,
morally and individually responsible for the domestic problems that plague this
country.
I excluded the members of the Federal Reserve Bank because that problem
was created by the Congress. In 1913, Congress delegated its constitutional duty
to provide a sound currency to a federally chartered but private central bank.
I exclude all of the special interest and lobbyists for a sound reason. They
have no legal authority. They have no ability to coerce a senator, a congressman
or a president to do one cotton-picking thing. I don’t care if they offer a politi-
cian $1 million in cash. The politician has the power to accept or reject it.
No matter what the lobbyist promises, it is the legislator’s responsibility to
determine how he votes.
Don’t you see now the con game that is played on the people by the politi-
cians? Those 545 human beings spend much of their energy convincing you that
what they did is not their fault. They cooperate in this common con regardless
of party.
What separates a politician from a normal human being is an excessive
amount of gall. No normal human being would have the gall of Tip O’Neill,
who stood up and criticized Ronald Reagan for creating deficits.
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